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Cadmium Course

Cadmium is considered a rare metallic element and found world wide and found in al soils and rock. The ojectives of this general awareness course is: Explain the chemical hazards of cadmium Identify potential locations where cadmium may be found List what PPE may be required for handling Define chronic exposure effects

Visited 78 times
$12.95
90259

Walking Working Surfaces (Includes 8 courses)

OSHA Walking-Working Surfaces Answers What is the OSHA walking-working surfaces rule? According to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), general industry workers are exposed to walking and work surface hazards that can result in slips, trips, falls, and other injuries or fatalities. The new requirements under Subpart D, "Walking-Working Surfaces," provide employers with the flexibility to decide which fall protection method or system works best for the work operation. OSHA says that these multiple options, along with required inspections and training, will help employers prevent and eliminate walking-working surface hazards. What is encompassed in the rule? OSHA's revisions to Subpart D, "Walking-Working Surfaces," include a reorganization of the existing rule to make it clearer, necessitating a reformat of the entire subpart (29 CFR 1910.21 - .30). However, the most significant changes cover NEW requirements for a variety of walking-working surfaces throughout Subpart D, as well as introducing additional new requirements under other general industry standards, including Subpart I, "Personal Protective Equipment." To learn what the entire ruling encompasses in detail, download the free Walking-Working Surfaces: OSHA Takes Major Steps to Overhaul Slips, Trips, and Falls Standard whitepaper. Who needs to comply? All general industry workplaces. This is approximately 6.7 million establishments employing more than 100 million workers, including: •   Manufacturing •   Warehousing •   Utilities •   Oil & gas extraction •   Retailers •   Offices Why is compliance critical? According to Bureau of Labor Statistics data, slips, trips, and falls are the leading cause of workplace fatalities and injuries in general industry. OSHA says the new requirements will prevent nearly 30 workplace fatalities and 6,000 lost-workday injuries annually. This equates to an estimated cost savings of more than $300 million each year for employers affected by the new requirements. What are the requirements for the employer? In summary, the Agency kept many of the requirements under the old standard. However, OSHA also introduced key NEW provisions which require employers now to: •   Identify and evaluate slip hazards, trip hazards, and fall hazards in the workplace. This assessment must be done in accordance with 1910.132(d)(2) which requires the employer verify that this was performed through a written certification which identifies: >  The workplace evaluated; >  The person certifying that the evaluation was performed; and >  The date(s) of the hazard assessment. •   Provide appropriate personal protective equipment or fall protection systems (i.e., personal fall arrest system, travel restraint system, or a positioning device) to address the slip, trip, and fall hazards identified during the above required hazard assessment. •   Conduct regular inspections and maintenance of all walking-working surfaces in the workplace. •   Provide training that enables employees to recognize the hazards of falling and the procedures to be followed to minimize these hazards, including the use of personal fall protection, proper ladder climbing techniques, etc. Are there program requirements to satisfy the regulations? OSHA does NOT specify "program" requirements. Best practice, however, would include a safety and health management system that includes written plans which address the new requirements under Subpart D, including (but not limited to): •   Fall Protection (General), •   Inspections (including, but not limited to, those for walking and work surfaces – an opportunity to help an employer address other required inspection in their workplace), •   Equipment (e.g., Scaffolds, Ladders, Personal Fall Protection, Designated Areas, etc.), and •   Training. What must employees be trained on? Employers must train—and retrain when necessary—employees on the fall protection systems and equipment they use, including: •   Personal fall protection •   Ladder safety systems •   Designated areas •   Dockboards •   Safety nets •   Rope descent systems •   Portable guardrails •   Ladders Training must be done by a qualified person. To learn more about who is considered a qualified trainer and how to comply with the OSHA Walking-Working Surfaces regulations, check out the Walking Working Surfaces: What You Need to Know for Supervisors and Employees training program. What specific training is required for high hazard and employees requiring fall protection? Required training is task- and equipment-specific for any employee who uses fall protection or equipment specified under Subpart D. For example, a worker who uses a fixed ladder must be trained on how to use the personal fall protection system required when climbing the ladder, as well as safe climbing techniques. When must employers comply? The majority of the new requirements under Subpart D are effective January 17, 2017; however, OSHA has extended the compliance dates for a few requirements as specified in the following table: Subpart D Section •   1910.30(a) and (b) – Deadline by which employers must train employees on fall and equipment hazards     Compliance Date: May 17, 2017 •   1910.27(b)(1) – Certification of anchorages     Compliance Date: November 20, 2017 •   1910.28(b)(9)(i)(A) – Deadline by which employers must equip existing fixed ladders with a cage, well, ladder safety system, or personal fall arrest system Compliance Date: November 19, 2018 •   1910.28(b)(9)(i)(B) – Deadline by which employers must begin equipping new fixed ladders with a ladder safety system or personal fall arrest system Compliance Date: November 19, 2018 •   1910.28(b)(9)(i)(D) – Deadline by which all fixed ladders must be equipped with a ladder safety system or personal fall arrest system Compliance Date: November 18, 2036

Visited 53 times
$19.95
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Elevated Walking and Working Surfaces Course

Elevated Walking and Working Surfaces: (In Transition) OSHA proposes to revise the walking-working surfaces standards and the personal protective equipment standards in our regulations. The proposal is estimated to reduce the number of fall-related employee deaths and injuries by updating the rule to include new technology (including personal fall protection systems) and industry methods

Visited 39 times
$12.95
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Workplace Violence Course

Workplace violence is any act or threat of physical violence, harassment, intimidation, or other threatening disruptive behavior that occurs at the work site. It ranges from threats and verbal abuse to physical assaults and even homicide. It can affect and involve employees, clients, customers and visitors. Homicide is currently the fourth-leading cause of fatal occupational injuries in the United States. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries (CFOI), of the 4,547 fatal workplace injuries that occurred in the United States in 2010, 506 were workplace homicides. Homicide is the leading cause of death for women in the workplace.

Visited 25 times
$12.95
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Working Alone Safely (CS) Course

Working Alone - Monitoring and managing the safe behavior of a workforce can be a difficult task, even in an enclosed environment. Yet employees who work autonomously create even greater challenges for safety managers and workplace supervisors.

Visited 102 times
$12.95
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Slips Trips and Falls Course

Slips Trips Falls: Although some workplace slips, trips and falls are not serious accidents, statistics show that nonfatal slips, trips and falls account for approximately 20% of all injuries involving lost workdays. In fact, According to the National Safety Council’s Accident Facts (1995 edition is the most recent for which data is conclusive) slips, trips and falls rank as the fourth leading cause of fatal injuries to American Workers!

Visited 104 times
$12.95
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Safety Housekeeping (CS) Course

OSHA housekeeping rules (29 CFR 1910.22) state that "all places of employment, passageways, storerooms, and service rooms should be kept clean and orderly and in a sanitary condition." The regulation makes specific mention of keeping floors clean and dry: "To facilitate cleaning, every floor, working place, and passageway shall be kept free from protruding nails, splinters, holes, or loose boards." The regulation also says that "aisles and passageways shall be kept clear and in good repair."

Visited 81 times
$12.95
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PPE (CS) Course

Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) - OSHA requires the use of personal protective equipment (PPE) to reduce employee exposure to hazards when engineering and administrative controls are not feasible or effective in reducing these exposures to acceptable levels. Employers are required to determine if PPE should be used to protect their workers.

Visited 58 times
$12.95
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Hazcom (CS) Course

Hazard Communications - In order to ensure chemical safety in the workplace, information must be available about the identities and hazards of the chemicals. OSHA's Hazard Communication Standard (HCS) requires the development and dissemination of such information: Chemical manufacturers and importers are required to evaluate the hazards of the chemicals they produce or import, and Prepare labels and material safety data sheets (MSDSs) to convey the hazard information to their downstream customers. All employers with hazardous chemicals in their workplaces must have labels and MSDSs for their exposed workers, and train them to handle the chemicals appropriately.

Visited 101 times
$12.95
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Forklift Classroom (CS) Course

1910.178 - Each year, tens of thousands of injuries related to powered industrial trucks (PIT), or forklifts, occur in US workplaces. Many employees are injured when lift trucks are inadvertently driven off loading docks, lifts fall between docks and an unsecured trailer, they are struck by a lift truck, or when they fall while on elevated pallets and tines. Most incidents also involve property damage, including damage to overhead sprinklers, racking, pipes, walls, and machinery. Unfortunately, most employee injuries and property damage can be attributed to lack of safe operating procedures, lack of safety-rule enforcement, and insufficient or inadequate training.

Visited 23 times
$12.95
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Fire Prevention and Safety (CS) Course

1910.39 -Fire safety is important business. National Fire Prevention Week is intended to focus on the importance of fire safety in the home, in schools and at work. But workplace fire safety is the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's (OSHA) principal focus and saving lives and preventing injuries due to fire is a key concern. According to National Safety Council figures, losses due to workplace fires in 1988 totaled $3.1 billion. Of the more than 5,000 persons who lost their lives due to fires in 1988, the National Safety Council estimates 360 were workplace deaths. When OSHA conducts workplace inspections, it checks to see whether employers are complying with OSHA standards for fire safety. OSHA standards require employers to provide proper exits, fire fighting equipment, emergency plans, and employee training to prevent fire deaths and injuries in the workplace.

Visited 115 times
$12.95
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Ergonomics (CS) Course

Ergonomics is the science of fitting the job to the worker doing that job. The goal of ergonomics is to reduce a worker's exposure to musculoskeletal disorder (MSD) risk factors by changing the design of a workstation or the way a job is performed, allowing workers to rotate through different jobs, or providing personal protective equipment (PPE). While the Clinton-era ergonomics standard was revoked, OSHA will cite ergonomics violations under the General Duty Clause.

Visited 102 times
$12.95
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Electrical Safety - Unqualified Course

Electrical Safety: -STD 01-16-007: Understanding the electrical safety for unqualified workers plan at your facility is crucial to your safety. Unqualified workers, in this case, are machine operators, operators of powered industrial trucks, construction workers, and other personnel who are not specifically qualified to perform electrical work, but who need to know essential information about the hazards of electricity and how to prevent serious injury.

Visited 75 times
$12.95
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Bloodborne Pathogens (CS) Course

1910.1030 - Blood borne Pathogens: The OSHA Bloodborne Pathogens standard (29 CFR 1910.1030) requires employers to eliminate, or at least minimize, the hazards of occupational exposure to bloodborne pathogens. The standard requires employers of workers at risk of occupational exposure to blood or OPIM to develop a written Bloodborne Pathogen Exposure Control Plan. In addition, such employers must implement a combination of safety measures including engineering and work practice controls, personal protective equipment, employee training, and offering potentially exposed workers the vaccination against hepatitis B.

Visited 84 times
$12.95
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Back Safety (CS) Course

Back injuries can be extremely painful and long-lasting. OSHA reports that "back strain due to overexertion represents one of the largest segments of employee injuries in the American workplace. Only the common cold accounts for more lost days of work." The National Safety Council has stated that overexertion is the cause of about 31 percent of all disabling work injuries. It's important to know what types of acts are likely to cause back strain and how to work in ways to reduce the risk. General Duty Clause: Workplace hazards that can result in back injuries are subject to OSHA citations under the General Duty Clause of the Occupational Safety and Health Act.

Visited 85 times
$12.95
83900

Comprehensive Safety Awareness Training Course Bundle (Includes 97 Courses)

This bundle includes 97 courses, regularly priced at $12.95 each...now for only $69.99 total! Under the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, employers are responsible for providing a safe and healthful workplace. No person should ever have to be injured, become ill, or die for a paycheck. The importance of training your employees – both new and experienced — cannot be overemphasized. Effective training of new employees results in employees who: Know what they’re doing Save time Have a good feeling about the company Get off to a good start. Retraining of employees provides for continued  "insurance" against accident and incidents. To assist employers, safety and health professionals, training directors and others with a need to know, OSHA’s training-related General Awareness training courses have been collected in this online training bundle. Topical General Awareness Requirements for training are included in this group of courses as well as industry specific  training. Training in the safe way for workers to do their jobs well is an investment that will pay back over and over again in fewer injuries and illnesses, better morale, lower insurance premiums and more. It is a good idea to keep a record of all safety and health training. Documentation can also supply an answer to one of the first questions an incident investigator will ask: “Did the employee receive adequate training to do the job?” * Comprehensive General Awareness Training Curriculum for your firm's safety program. * One Purchase and you have every course you need to train multiple employees. * An annual fixed cost per trainee for solid budget planning.

Visited 254 times
$69.99
84386

Public and Private Security Personnel Training Awareness Bundle (Includes 40 courses)

This bundle includes 40 courses, regularly priced at $12.95 each...now for only $69 total! A private security officer's primary duty is the prevention and deterrence of crime. Security personnel enforce company rules and can act to protect lives and property, and they often have a contractual obligation to provide these actions. In addition to basic deterrence, security officers are often trained to perform specialized tasks such as arrest and control (including handcuffing and restraints), operate emergency equipment, perform first aid, CPR, take accurate notes, write detailed reports, and perform other tasks as required by the client they are serving. Just as with the police profession, training requirements for the private security industry have evolved over time. For many years security guards were poorly chosen and poorly trained (if at all), partly because security guard companies who contracted with clients in private industry were paid very little for their security guard services. For the most part, contracts were awarded to security guard companies through a competition process and the final selection was often made based on cost rather than the experience or professionalism of the security guard company. That changed drastically on September 11, 2001 when radical terrorists attacked the United States. The event moved corporate threat concerns to the top of the priority list for most security guard contracts started being awarded based on professionalism. More money was invested in security so more money became available for training of security guards. The term 'security professional' began to surface and large private security companies like Blackwater, USA began offering training services for the private security industry that approached the level of training provided by the military. Security guard companies began paying enough to attract people with significant backgrounds in law enforcement and the military, often in special operations.

Visited 85 times
$69.00
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Waste Management Training Course

Waste management is the collection, transport, processing or disposal, managing and monitoring of waste materials. The term usually relates to materials produced by human activity, and the process is generally undertaken to reduce their effect on health, the environment or aesthetics. Waste management is a distinct practice from resource recovery which focuses on delaying the rate of consumption of natural resources. All waste materials, whether they are solid, liquid, gaseous or radioactive fall within the remit of waste management.

Visited 48 times
$12.95