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83727

Emergency Response V2.16 Course

Emergency Response: OSHA and its State Plan partners help set and implement national safety and health standards for emergency responders. Foremost among these standards is the Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response standard of 29 CFR 1910.120(q).

Visited 82 times
$12.95
83385

Universal Waste V2.6 Course

Universal waste is a category of waste materials designated as "hazardous waste", but containing materials that are very common. It is defined in 40 C.F.R.273.9, by the United States Environmental Protection Agency but states may also have corollary regulations regarding these materials.

Visited 72 times
$12.95
25397

PPE for Emergency Response Course

This course will take approximately 24 minutes to complete. Personal protective equipment, or PPE, provides a barrier between employees and the job hazards. The right PPE, properly used and maintained, can protect employees from the hazards involved in the emergency response tasks they perform. This training session will address how to select the right equipment for the job, how to understand its capabilities and limitations, and how to use it properly and remove it safely.

Visited 1,163 times
$23.00
25377

Disaster Planning - What Employees Need to Know Course

This course will take approximately 24 minutes to complete. Making sure that all employees receive basic emergency response training is a critical part of disaster planning, whether you are planning for a workplace fire or a natural disaster like a tornado or flood. This training session will help you to identify different types of workplace disasters, understand the requirements of your emergency response plan, carry out emergency response assignments effectively, and evacuate quickly and safely in an emergency. Why Training about "Disaster Planning - What Employees Need to Know" Matters Fires are the most common type of workplace emergency. The National Fire Protection Association reports that a fire department somewhere in America responds to a fire every 16 seconds. The Bureau of Labor Statistics estimates that fires cause as many as 10,000 employee injuries and 200 employee deaths every year. In addition, the U.S. Fire Administration says that losses from industrial fires cost U.S. businesses over $4 billion a year in property losses and more than $8 billion in business interruption costs. Explosions resulting from fires, bombs, or other causes can claim many lives, leave many more badly injured, and destroy property. Natural disasters such as earthquakes and tornadoes can strike with little or no warning. Hurricanes and floods may be forecast, but effective emergency action in these situations may nevertheless be required. Toxic chemical releases can require emergency response within the workplace and in the surrounding community. Workplace violence can erupt at any time in any department. We must be prepared to respond quickly and appropriately in these dangerous and sometimes life-threatening situations. Since the Oklahoma bombing, the events of September 11, 2001, and subsequent terrorist activity around the world, it has become clear to all Americans that we must be prepared to face the possibility of terrorist attacks in the workplace at any time.

Visited 1,621 times
$23.00
25378

Disaster Planning - What Supervisors Need to Know Course

This course will take approximately 23 minutes to complete. This course will help you to recognize the types of workplace disasters you may face, understand the requirements of the emergency response plan, satisfy employee training requirements, and carry out emergency response duties effectively. Why Training about "Disaster Planning - What Supervisors Need to Know" Matters Fires are the most common type of workplace disasters. The National Fire Protection Association reports that a fire department somewhere in America responds to a fire every 16 seconds. The Bureau of Labor Statistics estimates that fires cause as many as 10,000 employee injuries and 200 employee deaths every year. The U.S. Fire Administration says that losses from industrial fires cost U.S. businesses over $4 billion a year in property losses and more than $8 billion in business interruption costs. Explosions resulting from fires, bombs, or other causes can claim many lives, leave many more badly injured, and destroy property. Natural disasters such as earthquakes and tornadoes can strike with little or no warning. Hurricanes and floods may be forecast, but effective emergency action in these situations may nevertheless be required.

Visited 932 times
$23.00